Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Roadside Attraction: Tallest Uncle Sam in the World - Lake George, NY

Tallest Uncle Sam in the World
Lake George, NY


N 43° 23.754 W 073° 42.190



Quick Description: 

The World's tallest statue of Uncle Sam is located outside the Magic Forest amusement park in Lake George, NY.



Long Description:

In the parking area outside the Magic Forest Amusement Park stands a giant fiberglass Uncle Sam statue. The statue is surrounded by a low iron fence. A sign on the fence is inscribed:

HERE STANDS UNCLE SAM
THE WORLD'S TALLEST UNCLE SAM
WAS BOUGHT FROM DANBURY
FAIR IN 1981. ERECTED HERE AT
MAGIC FOREST IN 1982. HE STANDS 
38 FEET TALL, WEIGHS 4,500 LBS.
AND IS MADE OF FIRERGLASS.
REPAINTED WITH ACME BASE COAT
CLEAR COAT SYSTEM IN 1992.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Statue of Historic Figure: Samuel Wilson, a.k.a. Uncle Sam - Arlington, MA

Samuel Wilson
"Uncle Sam"
Arlington, MA


N 42° 24.952 W 071° 09.184



Short Description: 

A monument at the birthplace of Samuel Wilson honors the man that legend asserts is the source of the personification of the United States, Uncle Sam. It is located in Uncle Sam Plaza at Mystic Street north of Massachusetts Avenue in Arlington, MA.

Long Description:

A memorial to Samuel Wilson has two sculptures. An 8.67' high bronze statue depicts Wilson wearing a double breasted jacket and long-tailed coat. Wilson is carrying a top hat in the crook of his bent left arm. His right hand held downward with his open palm facing forward. The memorial was was commissioned by Fredrick A. Hauck of Cincinnati, OH and sculpted by Theodore Cotillo Barbarossa.

To Samuel Wilson's right is a relief sculpture with the familiar image of "Uncle Sam" wearing a top hat and tails. At the top is a butcher and a ship coming in to dock next to the word TROY In the middle of the relief is a man and woman standing behind a fence with the words MASON N-H. At the bottom is a soldier on horseback above the word MENOTOMY the former name for Arlington.

The monument has the following inscriptions:

Above the sculpture:

SAMUEL WILSON
1766-1854
Below the sculptures:

IN HONOR OF SAMUEL WILSON
A NATIVE SON
BORN NEAR THIS SITE
ON SEPTEMBER 13, 1766
HE BECAME
OUR NATIONAL SYMBOL
UNCLE SAM



A bronze plaque on the side of the monument has the left profile of Fredrick A. Hauck and is inscribed:

UNVEILED
SEPTEMBER
 11-1976

DEDICATED
APRIL-18, 1977

FREDERICK A. HAUCK

A GIFT TO THE TOWN OF ARLINGTON
MASS. AND THE PEOPLE OF THE 
UNITED STATES THROUGH THE GENEROUS
CONTRIBUTION OF FREDERICK A. HAUCK
OF CINCINNATI, OHIO

DESIGNER-SCULPTOR T.C. BARBAROSSA
BELMONT, MASS.
CAST BY ELEFTHERIOS KARKADOULIAS
CINCINNATI, OHIO

PROJECT COORDINATOR
THE ARLINGTON JAYCEES

BOARD OF SELECTMEN
ARTHUR D. SAUL, JR., CHAIRMAN
ROBERT B. WALSH
ANN MAHON POWERS
MARGARET H. SPENGLER
ROBERT H. MURRAY

TOWN MANAGER
DONALD R. MARQUIS

UNCLE SAM STATUE COMMITTEE
WILLIAM J. BECK
JACK R. DONALDSON
JAMES D. HOBBS
JAMES F. LAWSON, JR.
STEPHEN PEKICH
FREDERICK E. PITCHER
JOHN G. PERRY
WILLIAM J. SCAGLIONE

Samuel Wilson was born in Arlington, MA, known as Menotomy, on September 13, 1766. When he was young he moved with his family to Mason, NH. At age 15 he joined the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War where he was introduced to the meat packing trade. After the war he and his brother moved to Troy, NY where they started E & S Wilson, a meat packing business.

During the War of 1812 Elbert Anderson Jr. of New York City had the contract to supply meat to all US troops. He contracted with Sam Wilson's company to supply United States troops with barrels of meat. The barrels were labeled "E.A.-U.S." for Elbert Anderson - United States. The troops south of Troy that received the barrels were familiar with Samuel Wilson and interpreted the U.S to mean Uncle Sam, Wilson's nickname, and the legend was born. Samuel Wilson became the personification of the United States.

However, there is evidence that Uncle Sam was in use long before the War of 1812. Uncle Sam is mentioned in the 13th stanza of the original lyrics to the popular 1775 song "Yankee Doodle".

Old Uncle Sam come there to change
Some pancakes and some onions,
For 'lasses cakes, to carry home
To give his wife and young ones

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Grave of a Famous Person: Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet - Hartford, CT

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet
Cedar Hill Cemetery
Hartford, CT



N 41° 43.218 W 072° 41.911



Short Description: 

The grave of educator of the deaf and author of children's books on theological topics and Biblical biographies Reverend Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet is located in Cedar hill Cemetery, 453 Fairfield, Avenue, Hartford, CT.



Long Description:

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet is buried in a large family plot that has center is a tall base topped with an urn and is inscribed GALLAUDET on the side facing the graves of family members. A ground level granite grave marker is inscribed:


THOMAS H. GALLAUDET,
BORN DEC. 10, 1787,
DIED SEPT. 10, 1851

The Reverend Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet was born in Philadelphia, PA on December 10, 1787. His family moved to Hartford, CT when he was 13 years old. He graduated Yale University with highest honors in 1805, and then earned a master's degree from Yale in 1808. He became a minister upon graduation from Andover Theological Seminary in 1815.

As a pastor Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet met a deaf-mute child, Alice Cogswell, whose father, Dr. Mason Cogswell, wished to establish a special school for deaf children. Gallaudet went to Europe in 1815 to study established systems of symbolic instruction for the deaf. There he met Laurent Clerc who took him to Paris to learn Abbé Sicard's method for teaching deaf-mutes. Gallaudet mastered his methods and returned to America and on April 15, 1817 established with Laurent Clerc and Mason Cogswell the first institution for the education of the deaf in North America, now known as the American School for the Deaf. In 1894 Gallaudet University was named in honor. He was honored by the United States Postal Service with a 20 cent stamp in the Great American Series.

In addition, The Reverend Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet used his theological background to become a prolific author writing a series of books about on theology and Biblical topics mostly for young children. Among the books he wrote are:

The Child's Book on the Soul
The Child's Book on Repentance: Designed Also for Older Persons
The Youth's Book on Natural Theology
The Child's Book on the Fall of Man
Scripture Biography for the Young: Adam to Jacob
Scripture Biography for the Young: David and Solomon, Including Saul and Rehoboam
Scripture Biography for the Young: Moses
Scripture Biography for the Young: Joshua and Judges
Solomon to Ahaz: Including Rehoboam, Jeroboam, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Ahab, Jehu, Elijah, Elisha, and Jonah
The History of Jonah for Children
The History of Josiah, the Young King of Judah
The History of Joseph, for children and youth; designed also as an aid to familiar Biblical exposition in families, Sabbath schools, and Bible classes
The Mother's Primer, to Teach Her Child Its Letters and how to Read: Designed Also for the Lowest Class in Primary Schools on a New Plan
The Child's Picture Defining and Reading Book
Discourses

Friday, June 30, 2017

Grave of a Famous Person: Julia Ward Howe - Watertown, MA

Julia Ward Howe
Mt. Auburn Cemetery
Watertown, MA


N 42° 22.178 W 071° 08.828



Short Description: 

The grave of poet, author, abolitionist, and women's rights activist Julia Ward Howe is located along Spruce Avenue opposite Pyrola Path in Mount Auburn Cemetery.

Long Description:

A simple stone marker facing Spruce Avenue marks the grave of Julia Ward Howe. The stone is inscribed:

JULIA WARD HOWE
Daughter of
SAMUEL WARD
Wife of 
SAMUEL GRIDLEY HOWE
Born May 27, 1819
Died October 10, 1910

Julia Ward was born on May 27, 1819 in New York City. She was educated by private tutors and in schools for young ladies until she was sixteen. She married physician and social reformer Gamuel Gridley Howe in 1843. Together the couple had six children.

She wrote essays on Goethe, Schiller and Lamartine which were published in the New York Review and Theological Review. She is most famous for writing the lyrics the the Union Civil War anthem The Battle Hymn of the Republic in 1861. After the War she became an activist for pacifism and women's suffrage. She helped found the New England Women's Club and the New England Woman Suffrage Association. In 1869, she became co-leader, with Lucy Stone, of the American Woman Suffrage Association. Howe was elected president of the Association for the Advancement of Women in 1881 and founded the Century Club of San Francisco. In 1890, she helped found the General Federation of Women’s Clubs.

Julia Ward Howe was the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, in 1908. She was inducted posthumously into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970. She was honored by the United States Postal Service with a 14 cent stamp in the Great American Series.

Selected works from Wikipedia:

Poetry:

Passion-Flowers (1854)
Words for the Hour (1857)
The Battle Hymn of the Republic (1861)
From Sunset Ridge: Poems Old and New (1898)
Later Lyrics (1866)
At Sunset, published posthumously (1910)

Other works:

The Hermaphrodite, Incomplete (1846 to 1847)
A Trip to Cuba (1860)
From the Oak to the Olive (1868)
Modern Society, essays (1881)
Margaret Fuller (Marchesa Ossoli), a biography, (1883)
Woman's Work in America (1891)
Is Polite Society Polite? , essays (1895)
Reminiscences: 1819–1899, an autobiography (1899)

Civil War Monument: Bigelow Sphinx - Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Watertown, MA

Bigelow Sphinx
Watertown, MA


N 42° 22.396 W 071° 08.724

Quick Description: 

The Bigelow Sphinx was was commissioned and funded by Dr. Jacob Bigelow to commemorate the end of the American Civil War. It is located in a landscaped circle along Cedar Avenue in Mount Auburn Cemetery.

Long Description:

The Bigelow Sphinx is considered to be one of the most unusual Civil War monuments. A 6' high by 3' wide by 10' long sculpture of a sphinx with the face of an Anglo-American woman and the body of an African lion sits on a 5' by 5' by 15' base. The sculpture was commissioned by Dr. Jacob Bigelow and created by the famous Irish-American sculptor Martin Milmore. It was erected in Mount Auburn Cemetery in 1872.



On the right side of the base of the Bigelow Sphinx is the Latin inscription:

AMERICA CONSERVATA
AFRICAN LIBERATA
POPULO MAGNO ASURGENTE
HEROUM SANGUINE FUSO



On the left side of the base is the English equivalent:

AMERICAN UNION PRESERVED
AMERICAN SLAVERY DESTROYED
BY THE UPRISING OF A GREAT PEOPLE
BY THE BLOOD OF FALLEN HEROES

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Grave of a Famous Person: Dorothea L. Dix - Watertown, MA

Dorothea L. Dix
Mt. Auburn Cemetery
Watertown, MA


N 42° 22.397 W 071° 08.800



Short Description: 

The grave of teacher, author, nurse, and prison and mental health reformer Dorothea Lynde Dix is located along Spruce Avenue at the intersection of Columbine Path in Mount Auburn Cemetery.

Long Description:

The grave of Dorothea L. Dix is marked by a simple, unadorned headstone that is inscribed:

DOROTHEA L. DIX

Dorothea L. Dix was born on April 4, 1802 in Hampden, Massachusetts (now Maine). She grew up in Worcester MA. Around 1821 she started a school in Boston, serving well-to-do families. Soon she began teaching poor and less fortunate children. While teaching she was the author of many books for children. Ill health forced her to give up teaching.

She then traveled and witnessed the injustices of slavery and developed abolitionist views. Upon traveling to Europe she met reformers who inspired her to start working on equal rights for the mentally ill. Between 1840-41 she conducted a statewide investigations of care for the indigent mentally ill in Massachusetts. She published the first of several influential books titled Memorial to the Legislature of Massachusetts. She continued her crusade for the mentally ill in several other states. Her efforts were successful in the founding the first public mental hospital, the Harrisburg State Hospital in Pennsylvania. She also became an advocate for prison reform.

During the Civil War, Dix set aside her previous work to focus completely on the war effort. She was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses by the Union Army. In this capacity set guidelines for nurses that she personally trained and hired. At the end of the war, she resumed her crusade to improve the care of prisoners, the disabled, and the mentally ill.

Dorothea L. Dix died on July 18, 1887 in Trenton, NJ at the age of 85. She was honored by the United States Postal Service with a 1 cent stamp in the Great American Series.

Books by Dorothea L. Dix:

The Garland of Flora (botany)
Alice and Ruth
American Moral Tales: For Young Persons
Conversations on Common Things, or Guide to Knowledge: With Questions
Evening Hours
George Mills, or, The Little Boy Who Did Not Love His Books
Hymns for Children
Private Hours
The Trials of a School Girl
The Lady and the President : the letters of Dorothea Dix & Millard Fillmore

Books about mental health and prison reform:

On Behalf of the Insane Poor
Remarks on Prisons and Prison Discipline in the United States
Memorial to the Legislature of Massachusetts
Fifth Letter to Convicts in State Prisons and Houses of Correction, Or County Penitentiaries
Memorial of Miss D. L. Dix in Relation to the Illinois Penitentiary
Memorial of Miss D. L. Dix to the Hon. The General Assembly in Behalf of the Insane of Maryland

Grave of a Famous Poet: Frances Sargent Osgood - Watertown, MA

Frances Sargent Osgood
Watertown, MA


N 42° 22.216 W 071° 08.727



Short Description: 

The poet Frances Sargent Osgood, née Frances Sargent Locke, was one of the most well-known women writers of the mid-19th century. Her grave is located along Orange Path in Mount Auburn Cemetery.



Long Description:

The grave of Frances Sargent Osgood, and her three children, is located within a low fenced-in rectangular area. A 6' tall stone base is topped by a lyre shaped bronze sculpture supporting a bronze wreath that was inspired by her poem "The Hand That Swept the Sounding Lyre". The stone base is inscribed:

FRANCES SARGENT OSGOOD
died May 12, 1850
AEt. 38 yrs. 11 mos.

ELLEN FRANCES OSGOOD
died Aug. 31, 1851
AEt. 15 yrs. 11 mos.

MAY VINCENT OSGOOD
died June 26, 1851
AEt. 11 yrs. 11 mos.

FANNY FAY OSGOOD
died Oct. 25, 1847
AEt. 16 mos.

Frances Sargent Locke was born in Boston, MA on June 18, 1811. She attended the Boston Lyceum for Young Ladies and started writing poetry at a young age. She published her first poems when she was 14 years old in a periodical of children's poetry called Juvenile Miscellany. She continued writing for children throughout her life.

Frances Sargent Locke married the artist Samuel Stillman Osgood on October 7, 1835. Together they had three children. They moved to England where she published her collection of poems A Wreath of Flowers from New England and The Casket of Fate. She returned to Boston in 1839 and then the family moved to New York City where she sometimes wrote under the pseudonyms "Kate Carol" or "Violet Vane". In 1841 she published The Poetry of Flowers and the Flowers of Poetry in 1845 she began a public relationship with Edgar Allen Poe. Together they published several valentine poems they wrote to one another.

Frances Sargent Osgood reconciled with her husband and they and moved to Philadelphia where she became ill. She died of tuberculosis on May 12, 1850 at the age of aged 38.

Writings of Frances Sargent Osgood include:

THE HAND that swept the sounding lyre
  With more than mortal skill,
The lightning eye, the heart of fire,
  The fervent lip are still!
No more, in rapture or in woe,      
  With melody to thrill,
        Ah, nevermore!

But angel hands shall bring him balm
  For every grief he knew,
And Heaven’s soft harps his soul shall calm    
  With music sweet and true,
And teach to him the holy charm
  Of Israfel anew,
        Forevermore!

Love’s silver lyre he played so well    
  Lies shattered on his tomb,
But still in air its music-spell
  Floats on through light and gloom;
And in the hearts where soft they fell,
  His words of beauty bloom    
        Forevermore!

Poetry:

A Wreath of Flowers from New England  (collection)
"To My Book"
Elfrida, a dramatic poem in five acts
The Casket of Fate  (collection)
"So Let It Be"
"Echo-Song"
"Forgive and Forget"
"The Hand That Swept the Sounding Lyre"
"Little Red Riding-Hood"
"Old Friends"
"A Shipwreck"
"A Song"
"To S. S. Osgood"
"Why Will A Rose-Bud Blow?"
"The Violet's Love"

Books:

The Poetry of Flowers and the Flowers of Poetry
The Snowdrop: A New Year Gift for Children
Rose, Sketches in Verse
Puss in Boots
The Marquis of Carabas
Cries in New York
Poems